Yoga

Swadhyaya

The fourth Niyama is Swadhyaya. Swa means ‘self’, Adhyaya means ‘inquiry’ or ‘examination’.

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Tapas: Austerity

Tapas means the austerity. Tapas is a continuous positive effort done by any seeker, till he reaches his goal. There is a story of Panini that gives a clear understanding of Tapas.

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Santhosha: Contentment

Santhosha is the second of the Niyamas. Santhosha means contentment. Santosha means modesty and the feeling of being content with what we have. To be at peace within and content with one's lifestyle, finding contentment, even while experiencing life's difficulties for life becomes a process of growth through all kinds of circumstances.

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Shoucha: Cleanliness

The first of the five Niyamas is shoucha, which means cleanliness or purity. Shoucha removes negative thoughts and makes us healthy. Right from small things like brushing teeth etc., fixed rules and regulations have been placed, such that utmost cleanliness prevails in the society.

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Niyama

Niyama is the second step of Ashtanga Yoga. Niyama means personal code. Niyama means "rules" or "laws." These are the rules prescribed for personal observance.

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Aparigraha: Non-possessiveness

Aparigraha means to take only what is necessary, and not to take advantage of a situation or act greedy. We should only take what we have earned; if we take more, we are exploiting someone else.

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Asteya: Non Stealing

Asteya is the third of the Yamas, following Satya. Asteya means non-stealing. Asteya is the opposite-to take nothing that does not belong to us. Lack of gratitude can fuel an unhealthy desire for things that we don't currently have, such as name brand clothes, or the most supped up car.

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Satya: Truthfulness

Satya is the second of the Yamas, following Ahimsa. Satya means truthfulness. Satya means "to speak the truth," yet it is not always desirable to speak the truth on all occasions, for it could harm someone unnecessarily. We have to consider what we say, how we say it, and in what way it could affect others. If speaking the truth has negative consequences for another, then it is better to say nothing.

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Ahimsa: Non Violence

Ahimsa means following non-violence in action, speech and even in the mind.  One can hurt a person in three ways namely, by deeds, by words or by thought! All three forms of hurting are not good and one should avoid these.

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Hatha Yoga Pradipika

Hatha Yoga Pradipika of Swathmarama is a Hatha Yoga text which starts from physical level.

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Patanjali Yoga Sutra

The yoga sutra’s of Maharshi Patanjali, which is also called ‘Raja Yoga’ are short and easy to remember.

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Vibhagiya Prnayama (Adhama, Madhyama, Adya and Purna Shvasa)

This Pranayama helps in utilizing all the three lobes or sections - abdominal, thoracic and clavicular. It aids in deep breathing. Breathing becomes continuous, smooth and rhythmic. It corrects the wrong breathing pattern and increases the vital capacity of the lungs.

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Bhramari Pranayama

The word Bhramari is derived from bhramara which means a "black humming bee". In this pranayama, the practitioner makes the sound which resembles the buzzing sound of a black bee, therefore it is named Bhramari Pranayama.

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Nadi Shuddhi (Anuloma Viloma)

While practicing Nadi Shuddhi, one inhales through the left nostril and then exhales through the right nostril, then the order is reversed by inhaling through the right nostril, and exhaling through the left nostril. This pranayama is called Nadi Shuddhi Pranayama. It is also called Anuloma viloma.

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Kapalabhati: Cleansing Breath

Kapalabhati is considered a kriya (cleansing breath) which cleanses the frontal brain. In Sanskrit, Kapala means "skull" and bhati means "shine". Thus, Kapalabhati, helps to improve the functions of the organs located in the skull.

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Pranayama

Pranayama popularly known as yogic breathing, involves a conscious manipulation of our breathing pattern. Pranayama consists of the breathing techniques which help with the control of breath or respiratory process.

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Ubhaya Jatru Trataka

Follows these simple steps.

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Vama Dakshina Jatru Trataka

The first important Trataka is Vama Dakshina Jatru Trataka.

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Kriyas

Kriya in Sanskrit means completed action. It is also a cleansing technique. There are six kriyas which helps to cleanse various internal organs.

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Surya Namaskar

Surya means "Sun" and Namaskara means "Salutation". It is basically saluting the sun using various postures. Surya Namaskara is a series of 12 physical postures. These postures stretch various muscles and the spinal column resulting in flexibility of the whole body.

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Shavasana: Supine Relaxation Posture

By remaining motionless for some time and keeping the mind still while you are fully conscious, you learn to relax. This conscious relaxation energises and refreshes both body and mind.

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Sarvangasana

In Sanskrit, sarva means ‘whole’ and anga means ‘parts of the body’ and asana means ‘posture’.

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Viparitakarani Kriya

The name comes from the Sanskrit words viparita, ‘inverted’ or ‘reversed’, and kriya, ‘a particular type of practice’.

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Supine Asanas

Supine Asanas are done lying in a face up position with the body supported by the back.

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Shalabhasana: Grasshopper Pose

Its name comes from the sanskrit, Salabha, meaning ‘locust’ or ‘grasshopper’, and asana, which means ‘posture’ or ‘seat’.

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Bhujangasana: Cobra Pose

In Sanskrit, "bhujanga" means serpent or snake and "asana" means pose. This is also known as cobra pose.

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Makarasna: Crocodile Pose

Makarasna is derived from two words - "Makar" meaning crocodile and "Asana" meaning pose. It is also known as the crocodile pose.

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Prone Posture

Prone Asana Sthiti (Initial) (Prone Posture) are done lying face down with the body being supported on the tummy.

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Ustrasana: Camel Pose

The name is derived from the Sanskrit Ustra, meaning "camel", and asana, meaning "pose" or "posture". This is also known as Camel pose.

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Shashank Asana: Hare Pose

The name comes from the Sanskrit Shash, meaning "hare" or "rabbit". Ank, means "lap"; and asana, which means "pose" or "posture". In English, it is known as hare pose.

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Vajrasana

The name comes from the Sanskrit words vajra, a weapon which means "thunderbolt" or "diamond", and asana means "posture" or "seat".

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Shithila Dandasana

Shithila (Relaxation) for sitting posture: Shithila Dandasana

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Dandasana

Starting position or Sthiti for sitting Posture: Dandasana.

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Pada Hastasana: Gorilla Pose

This posture's name comes from the Sanskrit word Pada which means ‘foot’. Hasta meaning ‘hand’ and asana meaning a ‘seat’ or ‘posture’. This posture is also known as gorilla pose or hand under foot pose.

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Ardha Chakrasana

In Sanskrit, Ardha means half, Chakra means wheel and Asana means a pose.

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Ardhakati Chakrasana: Half Waist Wheel Pose

The name of the Asana is derived from the words Ardha, meaning half and Kati, meaning waist and Chakra, which means a wheel. It is famous as half waist wheel pose also.

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Tadasana: Mountain Pose

Tadasana is considered by many yoga traditions to be the starting point or sthithi of all asana practice.

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Asana

The ancient rishis of India devised number of asanas. These are based on their observations of nature - animals, birds, etc. The asanas helps in flexibility of the spine in forward bending, backward bending and side bending.

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Yama

Patanjali Yoga is the system which consists of eight stages. These are Yama, Niyama, Asana, Pranayama, Pratyahara, Dharana, Dhyana and Samadhi. It is therefore widely called Ashtanga yoga (the yoga of eight stages).

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Basics of Yoga

Every one wants to be happy! Happiness directs our lives. To overcome the pain and to achieve happiness has been the fundamental drive in all humans. This natural feeling is found not only in human beings, but also in animals.

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History of Yoga

The development of yoga can be traced back to over 5,000 years ago, but some researchers think that yoga may be up to 10,000 years old. The science of Yoga has its origin thousands of years ago, long before the first religions or belief systems were born.

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Importance of Yoga

Yoga is an ancient spiritual science that seeks to bring the mind, body and spirit in balance. The word 'Yoga' is derived from the Sanskrit root 'Yuj' which means to attach, join, harness or yoke.

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